Summer is the time to plan the renovation of paddocks for Autumn 2021. Whether doing a chemical fallow, cultivation, or direct drill it is important to establish the nutrient levels and soil health prior to sowing so they can be amended beforehand to give your crop the best chance of optimal yields.

The BioAg approach to this involves soil testing including trace element analysis, major nutrients, and pH so farmers can plan a fertiliser, lime, and/or gypsum application over the summer.

In addition, farmers need to consider the biological health of their soils. Appropriate soil conditions promote populations of beneficial microbes that aid in nutrient cycling and improving soil structure, contributing to the overall health of your crop.

Fungi are critical in solubilising nutrients in the soil. Feeding on sugars to produce organic acids that convert elements into plant-available forms. Bacteria form strong symbiosis with the root tips and hairs to provide nutrients and organic compounds beneficial to plants.

The whole soil ecology works with plants to provide optimal conditions for soil chemical, physical and biological improvements to occur, hence getting both the nutrient and biological component of your soils balanced is the key to more resilient, healthier, and productive forage or crops.

Building soil carbon levels is a key part of improving soils and biological activity. Applying Digest-it Stubble with small amounts of nitrogen over summer, in conjunction with a rain event, and incorporating or providing stubble to soil contact, will aid the breakdown of stubble and decompose any plant residues, sequestering carbon.

When planting, an application of Soil & Seed prior to sowing will help activate biological processes, aiding early root development and early plant establishment.

Your local BioAg Area Managers are always available to assist with soil testing, nutritional advice and to discuss how BioAg’s products and plans can improve your farming system, or put you in contact with our distributor network.

Harvester on broad-acre cropping farm